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kulturkrig:

A map of Scandinavia made by an italian year 1565. 

(via scarlettlillies)

New Viking fortress found near Køge

archaeologicalnews:

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Found in a field belonging to the Vallo Diocese estate, a Viking Age circular fortress rewrites the Danish history books. It is the fifth construction of its kind found in Denmark, but the first such discovery in sixty years, reports Politiken.

“It’s great news!” Lasse CA Sonne, a Viking Age historian from the Saxo Institute at the University of Copenhagen, told the newspaper.

“Although, there were Vikings in other countries, these circular fortresses are unique to Denmark. Many have given up hope that there were many of them left.” Read more.

beautiful-tragicinthefalloutboy:

"Previously, researchers had misidentified skeletons as male simply because they were buried with their swords and shields. By studying osteological signs of gender within the bones themselves, researchers discovered that approximately half of the remains were actually female warriors, given a proper burial with their weapons."

(via minidia)

Archaeologists make spectacular discovery off Denmark’’s coast

archaeologicalnews:

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Archaeologists are currently raising and examining what is being called the oldest boat ever found in Denmark.

The ancient six to seven metre long vessel is estimated to be 6,500 years old – in comparison, the oldest Pyramid in Egypt is a mere 4,500 years old – and although it is damaged, archaeologists are finding it very interesting.

“It split 6,500 years ago and they tried to fix the crack by putting a bark strip over it and drilling holes both sides of it,” Jørgen Dencker, the head of marine archaeology at the Viking Ship Museum in Roskilde, told DR Nyheder. “That two-millimetre wide strip has been preserved.” Read more.

8,000-year-old skull found in Norway

archaeologicalnews:

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Archaeologists in Norway have found what might be an 8,000-year-old skull, possibly containing brain matter, in a dig site in Stokke, southwest of Oslo. They say the find could help explain living conditions in the Stone Age.

The team has been digging at the Stokke site for two months and believe that the site consists of two separate Stone Age settlements. Among many other findings at the dig, the latest find is a human skull, which still appears to contain brain matter, and they hope that the find will tell them something about how it was to live in the Stone Age.

Experts are not yet sure whether the skull belongs to an animal or a child, According to Gaute Reitan, dig site leader, “It is too early to say. We need help from bone experts.” Read more.

hideback:

Akseli Gallen-Kallela (Finnish, 1865 – 1931)

Lemminkäinen’s Mother, 1897

In the Finnish epic Kalevala, Lemminkäinen drowns in the river of the underworld while attempting to capture the Black Swan. His mother fishes her dead son’s body parts from the river and sews him back together. The only thing that can restore his life is a drop of honey from the dwelling of Ukko, the God of the Sky.

In this painting, Lemminkäinen’s mother waits for the bee to deliver the precious drop of honey to revive her son.

(via scarlettlillies)

Major Viking site discovery described as ‘mind-blowing’

archaeologicalnews:

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A tiny County Louth village has been confirmed as home to one of the most important Viking sites in the world.

Carbon testing on trenches at a ‘virgin’ site in Annagassan have revealed that the small rural community once housed a Viking winter base, one of only two in Ireland.

The other went on to become Dublin but the Annagassan site, 50 miles north of the capital, was believed to be the stuff of mythology and folklore until now.

Geophysical tests funded by Dundalk’s County Museum have allowed scientists to make the big breakthrough. Read more.

The Hammer of Thor

archaeologicalnews:

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A small hammer dating to the 10th century was found recently on the Danish Island of Lolland. Over 1000 of these amulets have been found across Northern Europe but the pendant from Lolland is the only one with a runic inscription.

This particular torshammere (Thor’s Hammer Amulet) was found at Købelev and reported to the Museum Lolland-Falster archaeologist Anders Rasmussen by detectorist Torben Christjansen.

Hammer pendants are interpreted as amulets shaped like Mjölnir, the hammer owned by the Norse god, Thor. Viking men and women often wore Thor’s hammer for protection.  “It was the amulet’s protective power that counted, and often we see torshammere and Christian crosses appearing together, providing double protection”, said Peter Pentz, an archaeologist at the National Museum of Denmark. Read more.

im-sylien:

In case some of you Viking fans, wants to hear what music sounded like in Denmark around 1300. It’s the oldest written song in all of Scandinavia. 

(via salmiakkivodka)

Archaeological sites targeted in Finland

archaeologicalnews:

Evidence of illegal, clandestine excavations has been recently discovered at two of Finland’s well-known prehistoric sites. Pits have been found at these separate locations, apparently the work of amateurs looking for ancient artifacts.

Acting on a tip from the public, Finland’s National Board of Antiquities has found a number of pits dug and then covered over in one of the graveyards associated with Rapola Castle, a prehistoric hill fortress in the municipality of Valkeakoski in Pirkanmaa. Earlier this spring, similar illicit digging was discovered at another hill fortress known as Hakoinen Castle in Janakkala. In both cases, there was damage to the archaeological integrity of the sites. Read more.

Viking Age Revninge woman: an exceptional find

archaeologicalnews:

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A newly discovered female figurine amulet from Revninge in the east of Denmark represents a very interesting find due to her remarkably detailed Viking Age dress.

On April 22, 2014, Paul Uniacke had started to explore a field near Revninge with his metal detector – several items had already been recovered when to his astonishment a small fine figurine appeared. He instantly recognised it as Viking Age and immediately contacted Østfyns Museums, who confirmed his thoughts and started the process of conservation.

It is not always easy to imagine how people of the Viking age really looked. However, the discovery of this small gilt silver figurine contains a wealth of detail giving new knowledge about costume and jewellery of the period. Read more.

Skeleton found on archaeological dig could be Irish Viking king

archaeologicalnews:

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It is believed that a skeleton discovered on an archaeological dig in East Lothian may be that of an Irish Viking king.

Olaf Guthfrithsson was the King of Dublin and Northumbria from 934 to 941. Archaeologists think the skeleton could belong to him or one of the members of his entourage.

The remains, which were excavated by AOC Archaeology Group at Auldhame in East Lothian in 2005, are those of a young adult male who was buried with a number of items indicating his high rank. These include a belt similar to others from Viking Age Ireland. Read more.

Genomic diversity and admixture differs for Stone-Age Scandinavian foragers and farmers

archaeologicalnews:

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An international team led by researchers at Uppsala University and Stockholm University reports a breakthrough on understanding the demographic history of Stone-Age humans. A genomic analysis of eleven Stone-Age human remains from Scandinavia revealed that expanding Stone-age farmers assimilated local hunter-gatherers and that the hunter-gatherers were historically in lower numbers than the farmers. The study is published today, ahead of print, in the journal Science.

The transition between a hunting-gathering lifestyle and a farming lifestyle has been debated for a century. As scientists learned to work with DNA from ancient human material, a complete new way to learn about the people in that period opened up. But even so, prehistoric population structure associated with the transition to an agricultural lifestyle in Europe remains poorly understood. Read more.

hedendom:

Galdrakver (‘Little Book Of Magic’)

The ‘Little Book Of Magic’ is a seventeenth-century Icelandic manuscript, written on animal skin and containing magical staves, sigils, prayers, charms and related texts.

It is known to have once been owned by Icelandic Bishop Hannes Finnson who was alive from 1739 until 1796 and known for having a vast library containing many volumes of magic related texts and manuscripts.

Full manuscript here.

(via cousinnick)

The History Channel’s popular show Vikings, now well into its second season, is based on the sagas of Ragnar Lothbrok.

Ragnar is a legendary viking king known for leading many raids until his final capture and defeat by King Ælla of Northumbria, after which his sons mounted a bloody invasion of England to avenge his death.

The historical existence of Ragnar Lothbrok is debated, as many of the deeds attributed to him are also attributed to other kings through different sources. Although his sons are known historical figures, there is little to no evidence that Ragnar himself actually existed as described in the sagas. Regardless, it seems that at least parts of Ragnar’s story are based in historical fact, though it is likely that his character is an amalgam of various kings and warriors that lived during his time.